Some of the harmful effects of child molestation
You make the difference, you make the change!
Some of the most common negative effects of child sexual abuse/molesting
1) Low self esteem because children often blame themselves and don't understand why they didn't stop the sexual molesting so
they feel that they are a bad person.

2) Negative body image due to self-blame. This may be intensified if physical pain was experienced during the abusive incidents.

3) A belief that one is now gay because they didn't stop the sexual abuse.

4) Relationship problems such as not being able to communicate feelings and also not being able to trust.

5) Self destructive behavior such as slicing, or attempting suicide. This is most common with sexual abuse that was physically
forced.

6) More likely to have multiple partners when it comes to sex.

7) Children that have been sexually abused in a non-physical threatening way, learn to use sex as a way to "escape" or forget
or cover their emotional pain. However, they do not understand that the effects of a lifestyle of using sex to cover emotional
pain is very destructive.

8) Children that have been molested and do not tell anyone and therefore do not get counseling will end up becoming child
molesters themselves.
Victims can be good at hiding what they know is wrong or what they are ashamed of. Young children, tend to
show behaviors that if an aware eye is watching, can be noticed. The PACS prevention guidelines address many
of these effects and also the lies that are believed by children that have been sexually molested. You can access
the guidelines for free by clicking on the link above.

There are two main types of child sexual abuse.

1) Sexual abuse/molesting that is not physically forced. This is where the abuser has engaged the child in sexual behavior that
because of the child's age feels sexually good to the child. They are not aware of the dangers of what is happening. Because
there is no physical threat or physical pain associated with this type of molestation, the child finds it hard to believe that it is
wrong. They have been taken advantage of. It becomes known as a "secret". The child is often told that if they want to keep
feeling good then no one can know.

2) Sexual molesting/abuse that is physically forced.  The abuser has engaged the child in sexual behaviors and the child knows it
is wrong and does not want to do it. So the abuser has threatened them, there family, there pet or have convinced them that
they will be in trouble by God or their parents if they tell. The outward behaviors of this type abuse are vastly more noticeable
then of molesting that is not physically forced and threatened. The protection guidelines also address the most common threats
and tricks used by molesters.
*** Studies show that 1 out of 4 boys that have been molested and have not received counseling and
emotional understanding about the abuse, have become pedophiles themselves. So make sure you know
how to identify if they have been sexually abused. Remember, 88% of child molestation cases are initially
unreported.